12th annual Eleanor M. Saffran Conference on Cognitive Neuroscience and Rehabilitation of Communication Disorders (Sept.15-16, 2017)

Dear Colleagues and Friends,

I am pleased to announce registration and scholarship opportunities for the 12th annual Eleanor M. Saffran Conference on Cognitive Neuroscience and Rehabilitation of Communication Disorders (Sept.15-16, 2017). This year, the topic is: Auditory Processing Disorders in Children and Adults: Foundations and Intervention. We have a terrific selection of speakers for Friday and Saturday and will be holding a workshop on translating research in auditory processing disorders to clinical practice (Saturday).

Also, we are once again sponsoring travel awards for pre- and post-doctoral fellows to attend the conference. The application for this competitive program is available here.

For clinicians, faculty and researchers: Please share the Conference Program and Student Scholar Application with colleagues and students who may be interested in attending.

For Ph.D. students and Post-doctoral fellows: To apply for a travel award, please complete the application form attached to this email to Nadine Martin, nmartin@temple.edu with the email subject line: “Saffran Student Scholar Awards 2017”. Applications are due July 17th, 2017

For all students (Undergraduates to Post-doctoral Fellows): attendance to the Saffran conference is free of charge, but you must register online. A student code is provided in the online registration, but proof of full time student status will be required at the conference site.

Registration is now open. To begin the registration process, click here.

A registration link is also available on our website at www.saffrancenter.com under Conferences > Register

Please feel free to call the conference manager, Sarah Meehan, at (215) 204-4350 or email at emsconf@temple.edu for any questions

We look forward to seeing you in September!

Thanks and best wishes,

Nadine Martin and Jamie Reilly
Conference Organizers
Eleanor M. Saffran Center for Cognitive Neuroscience
Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders
Temple University

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